Artist Cribs: Tony Oursler's Multimedia Madhouse

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2016

Tony Oursler takes you behind the scenes and into his studio. Check out his impressive video cassette tape archive and the spot where David Bowie's face was recorded "in the name of art." Learn more about Tony Oursler at SFMOMA.org: https://www.sfmoma.org/watch/tony-ourslers-electronic-effigies-between-two-spaces/


Tony Oursler talks about “Imponderable”

ARTFORUM

2016

New York–based artist Tony Oursler talks about “The Imponderable Archive,” a collection of more than 2500 photographs, objects, and ephemera related to the paranormal that was housed at the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies galleries, plus his film and book, Imponderable, both of which draw on the themes of his extensive archive. The film is screening at the Museum of Modern Art in New York through April 16, 2017. To read Hal Foster’s piece on “Jim Shaw: The End is Here” and “Tony Oursler: The Imponderable Archive,” pick up the December 2016 issue of Artforum, or read it online.


Lisson Gallery First Weekend: Tony Oursler and Adrian Searle

Feb 10, 2015

"Here's Looking at You: Facial Recognition and Identity in the Surveillance Age" Tony Oursler and the Guardian's chief art critic Adrian Searle speak about the artist's new show: template/variant/friend/stranger at Lisson Gallery (30 January - 7 March 2015). Read more at: http://www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/tony-oursler--5


Tony Oursler: Collaborating with David Bowie

“It was a very smooth collaboration. His fantasy took place inside my work.” Artist Tony Oursler talks about his David Bowie music video 'Where Are We Now' which was published on Bowie's 66th birthday. 'Where Are We Now' quickly went to number one in the iTunes charts in 17 countries and has been viewed more than 3,5 million times on YouTube alone. The video was shot at Oursler's studio in Manhatten, and is full of references to Bowie's past. “Moving forwards over decades, certain things are lost, but certain things are retained.” This is the basic idea of the video, as Oursler explains it. He adds how their “anti-rock video” was based on David Bowies ideas, and was shot within a strict deadline. At the core of the video is a conjoined rag doll with two faces projected onto it: a “mystery woman” and David Bowie's. The joint figure was a by-product from Bowie's 50th birthday celebrations at Madison Square Gardens in 1997, which Oursler also directed. The mystery woman is Ourslers wife, artist Jacqueline Humphries. New York based artist Tony Oursler (b.1957) works with video, sculpture, installation, performance and painting. Oursler's work has been exhibited in numerous prestigious institutions including MoMa, New York, the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, and Tate Liverpool. Interview: Jesper Bundgaard Camera and editing: Per Henriksen Produced by Christian Lund Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2013. Meet more artists at http://channel.louisiana.dk/ Louisiana Channel is a non-profit video channel for the Internet launched by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in November 2012. Each week Louisiana Channel will publish videos about and with artists in visual art, literature, architecture, design etc. Read more: http://channel.louisiana.dk/about Supported by Nordea-fonden.

Tony Oursler | Art in Progress | Reserve Channel

May 1, 2014


TateShots: Tony Oursler's Influence Machine

Feb 15, 2013


Interview: Tony Oursler

July 31, 2012


Tony Oursler - Lapsed Fantasist

May 14, 2012


TateShots: Tony Oursler – Studio Visit

 Jan 10, 2011